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Priest explains what to do if God says “no”

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Cerith Gardiner - published on 10/14/23

Fr. David Michael Moses reveals why the process of not having our prayers answered can be beneficial.

Sometimes when we reach out to God and pray for Him to listen and heed our requests, it can be very frustrating. While our prayers might be answered from time to time, there will be occasions when our prayers remain unanswered.

This can leave us feeling pretty angry with God. After all, we reach out in prayer to our Heavenly Father who has unconditional love for us. Why would He see our prayers unanswered?

It’s a question many of us might find ourselves asking, especially in moments when we’re stressed, frightened, or in desperate need of solutions to a problem.

Thankfully, Fr. David Michael Moses has looked to his own experience to explain why the occasional unanswered prayer is not a bad thing. And in fact, it’s actually something that can be very positive for us in the long term — and by long term, we mean eternity!

Without giving all of Father’s explanation away, consider what occurs when you reach out in prayer: how you consistently open your heart and soul to God, sharing your inner-most thoughts. As Fr. David Michael explains with the use of a parable, this “pestering” of God can only lead to one thing … Take a look at the video below to discover more.

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Catholic LifestyleFaithPrayer
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